Switzerland (which has a customs union with Liechtenstein, which is sometimes included in agreements) has bilateral agreements with the following countries and blocs:[41] The combination allows the use of products originating from a signatory country, as they have already been imported with certificates of origin from their country of origin. This means that primary materials that are already products originating from another signatory country should not be properly processed in Switzerland. Most (but not all) Swiss free trade agreements contain such a rule. This means that the determination of the country of origin of primary materials from a third country is not taken into account, provided that their value does not exceed 10% of the factory starting price. However, if a percentage rule is established in the list, it cannot be exceeded by the application of the general value tolerance. This is why this tolerance is particularly important for products for which the list provides for a jump in position. The general value tolerance cannot apply to products listed in Chapters 50 to 63 of the harmonized system, nor does it apply to products that have received only minimal processing in Switzerland. Note: Any customs union, every common market, any economic union, the Customs and Monetary Union and the Economic and Monetary Union are also a free trade area. List of agreements being negotiated. Agreements that have so far been discussed only in the absence of formal action by the parties concerned are not mentioned. Content of agreements The essential element of each agreement is trade in goods (including tariff reductions and other trade restrictions). They regulate trade in industrial products (SH chapters 25-97), fish and processed agricultural products. Trade in unprocessed agricultural products is generally governed by separate bilateral agricultural agreements.

The objective of preferential origin is to make goods duty-free when exporting to a free trade agreement or to subject them to a reduced duty. This document is accompanied by a certificate of movement of goods or a declaration of country of origin on invoice. Compliance with non-preferential country of origin rules does not exempt goods from customs when imported into a third country – these country of origin rules only apply if the destination country requires a country of origin certificate for importation. This should not be confused with the issue of Swissness („Made in Switzerland“), which is subject to another set of rules. The free trade agreement between Japan and Mexico was Japan`s first comprehensive agreement with a single country. Signed in 2004 and imposed in 2005, Japan has become, ten years later, Mexico`s fifth largest export destination, with $4.4 billion in exports. The Free Trade Agreement between Japan and Mexico, commonly known as the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA), has eased tariffs on goods and services. In 2011, the application of lower tariffs on certain agricultural products from Japan and on Mexican imports on auto parts and jet printing paper was revised. The partnership increased Japanese investment in Mexico because it had access to broader markets in the United States and Canada. Types of accumulation: bilateral accumulation: only with primary subjects of the two free trade partners (bilateral) (for example. B Switzerland-Japan or AELE-COLOMBIA).

Diagonal accumulation: possible with primary subjects of several free trade partners, as all apply the same country of origin rules (e.g.B. EU-EFTA-Turkey). Cumulative euro-med: this is also possible with primary materials from Mediterranean countries, since all the free trade partners concerned apply the same country of origin rules and there are agreements between them. Participating countries: Egypt, Algeria, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Syria, Tunisia, the West Bank and Gaza Strip, as well as the Faroe Islands.

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